222 Maspeth Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11211

East Williamsburg

"waste transfer station" superfund VOCs "vapor intrusion" MGP

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Cooper Tank
Founded in 1946 by Sam Cooper and his brother, Cooper Tank & Welding Corp. is a family run business led by owner and CEO Adrienne Cooper.[1]  The company's first product line included boiler expansion tanks & liquid fuel storage tanks.  Still operating out of the same Brooklyn building, on Moore St. between White St. and Bushwick Ave., where it started in business over a half century ago, Cooper Tank now primarily manufactures solid waste handling containers.  The current range of products includes front & rear loading containers, roll-off containers, recycling containers, compaction containers, and compaction equipment.  Today, Cooper Tank employs more than 160 people throughout their operations and make approximately 90 containers per week.  During container manufacturing the welding, cutting, and spray painting of metal releases particulates, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), xylene, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs).  Cooper Tank's manufacturing emissions are capped by the NYSDEC at 22.5 tons per year for VOCs and HAPs, and 9 tons per year for xylene.[2] 

In 1986 Cooper Tank established the construction & demolition waste transfer station detailed herein. Cooper Tank & Welding Corp. also operates two steel trading divisions, based in Virginia and New Jersey, which sell structural and plate steel.

Facility Contact: Ray Kvedaras
Phone: 718-384-7727
Website: www.coopertank.com
NYSDEC Registration #: 24W21

Equity Works
According to Sanborn Fire Insurance maps, Equity Works operated a manufactured gas plant at 222, 252 and 254 Maspeth Ave from at least 1907 until sometime prior to 1933.
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Cooper Tank
Cooper Tank handles construction and demolition debris, approximately 80% of which is recovered and recycled.[3]  The recycled materials include ferrous and nonferrous metals, plastics, aggregates, paper, cardboard, and clean wood which is ground up and used for landscaping and composting (the facility is one of only a few in the New York area that is approved by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as a disposal site for wood infested with Asian long horned beetles).  Some of the recyclables are bought by specialty companies that further clean and upgrade the material, while the bulk of the material is used as alternative daily cover at landfills where the remaining 20% of the transfer station throughput is buried.  Cooper Tank is actively seeking approval to expand their operations onto neighboring properties in order to increase efficiency and allow truck traffic to queue on site. 

Equity Works
Cooper Tank currently operates on top of the Equity Works State Superfund Site.  Operating a manufactured gas plant on site from 1907-1933, Equity Works polluted Newtown Creek and the soils and groundwater in and around the site with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyanide.  According to the Department of Environmental Conservation's site records, "wastes have been identified in the subsurface at this site, which could result in direct contact exposure if the wastes were brought to the surface" and "potential impacts from soil vapors need to be evaluated".[4]  However, according to Martin Brand, DEC Remedial Projects Manager, the threat of exposure has been reduced because the working surface at the site has been improved with crushed stone.  Inquiring as to the dangers of operating a waste transfer station on top of a State Superfund Site Brand responded, "the site's history and its current use make it very unlikely that any MGP-related material is present at the surface, and thus makes it quite unlikely that it is being released as dust at the present time.  The most significant problem at MGP sites is typically the release of coal tar from subsurface structures such as gas holders, tar separators, storage tanks, and associated piping.  Surface soil contamination (most often PAH compounds and lead) are sometimes encountered, but are often at levels not much greater than in surrounding properties."[5] 

Transfer or Disposal Destination, 2006[6]
In 2006 Cooper Tank handled 403,121 tons of material; this sum represents 3.3% of all waste exported through transfer stations in New York City.

Material

Amount (tons)

Facility Name

Location

310 processed construction and demolition debris

8,985

Hyland Facility Association

Angelica, NY

310 processed construction and demolition debris

18,120

Ontario County Landfill

Stanley, NY

construction and demolition debris

18,305

Hakes C&D Landfill

Painted Post, NY

construction and demolition debris

32,465

Phoenix Resource Landfill

Wellsboro, PA

construction and demolition debris

1,000

Carbon Limestone Landfill

Lowellville, OH

construction and demolition debris

1,480

Chemung Landfill

Elmire, NY

construction and demolition debris

223

Green Tree Landfill

Meadville, PA

construction and demolition debris

450

Waste Management

Brooklyn, NY

other masonry

119,380

OENJ

Bayonne, NJ

other masonry

19,720

Calverton Industries

Long Island, NY

metals

4,887

Hugo Neu Schnitzer

Brooklyn, NY

metals

2,510

TNT Scrap Metals

Long Island, NY

metals

21,710

Intercounty Transport

Brooklyn, NY

metals

2,396

Brooklyn Processing

Brooklyn, NY

woodchip

3,080

Burlington Resource

Burlington, NY

woodchip

5,022

County Conservation

County, NJ

woodchip

4,115

Reliable Recycling

Jersey City, NJ

woodchip

4,750

Petruzzo Products

Corinth, NY

woodchip

390

Rikers Island Organic Recycling[7] 

Rikers Island, NY

woodchip

500

Organic Recycling

Orangeburg, NY

plastic

270

State Street Recycling

Amboy, NJ

plastic

120

Reliable Recycling

Jersey city, NJ

screened fines

122,230

110 Sand Company

Farmingdale, NY

screened fines

3,213

Moretown Landfill

Waterbury, VT

screened fines

3,505

Waste Management

Brooklyn, NY

paper

4,208

Reliable Recycling

Jersey City, NJ

paper

Empire State

Queens, NY

aluminum

686

Federal Metal and Alloys

South Plainfield, NJ

  1. Cooper Tank and Welding Corp. website.  Accessed on 12/18/07.
  2. NYSDEC Permit Under the Environmental Conservation Law.
  3. Taylor, Brian.  "High volumes of C&D debris are sorted quickly at Brooklyn's tight-fitting Cooper Tank facility".  Construction and Demolition Recycling, May-June 2007.
  4. DEC Environmental Site Remediation Database.  Site Name:"K - Equity works"
  5. Personal correspondence.  12/4/07.  
  6. Cooper Tank. "Facility Annual Report, 2006". Filed with NYSDEC.  Numbers may not add up because of differences in the way tonnages are accounted for, e.g. scale weight vs. truck count, or because the records are incomplete.
  7. New York Times.  Douglas Martin.  12/19/99.  "Rikers Island Learns to Recycle; Behind Razor Wire, Gardens and a Composting Plant".   

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